boat tour of antelope canyon

We are going to let the pictures speak for themselves.  We try to give the reader the full experience in pictures (and for free), thus this post is long.  On Saturday morning, 23 September, 2017, we took a one hour boat tour of Antelope Canyon from the Antelope Point Marina near Page, Arizona (which is near the state line with Utah).  Lake Powell is the manmade lake that was formed by the waters of the Colorado River backing up behind Glen Canyon Dam (completed in the 1960s).  The Page area has several worthwhile attractions nearby to experience.

 

 

 

The marina from a distance.

 

 

Walking down to the marina.

 

 

A tour boat docked.

 

 

On board.

 

 

Moving out of the marina, and looking back at other boats.

 

 

Now in open water.

 

 

A view from the front of the boat.

 

 

A view from the rear.  Tower Butte is in the far distance as the solitary rock upthrust from the land.

 

 

Working our way towards the canyon.

 

 

The rocky shore and the blue water of the lake.

 

 

Another view.

 

 

Colorful sandstone.

 

 

A visitor on the water.

 

 

Next, we see ice berg shapes in sandstone.

 

 

A view from the front of the boat as we approach the entrance to the canyon.  The chimneys or smokestacks are the Navajo Generating Station located on the Navajo Reservation.

 

 

We may forget that these canyon walls or cliffs were quite high before the lake formed.  The lake is not shallow at all.

 

 

Other tourists taking pictures.

 

 

Looking back the way we came.

 

 

A kayaker set against an impressive background.

 

 

Another look back.

 

 

Kayakers in front of the cliffs.

 

 

The boat moved close to the rocks here while entering a curve in the canyon.  Two way boat traffic is a concern in such curves.

 

 

A look from the rear of the boat.

 

 

Sheer canyon walls or cliffs above us.

 

 

Powering further into the canyon.

 

 

Sheer sandstone cliffs meet the water near these kayakers.

 

 

Looking back.

 

 

Another onboard view.

 

 

The on board tour guide said that this canyon was one of 96 canyons along Lake Powell.

 

 

The morning sun and the blue sky help to accentuate the colors of the rocks as we look back.

 

 

A view from the front of the boat as we move further up the canyon.

 

 

On the boat as we continue on the water.

 

 

Another view of what is ahead.

 

 

From the side of the boat, we see the rock walls up close.

 

 

This tour boat left the docks only several minutes before us.  We are approaching the point where the boat will turn around and head back to the marina.

 

 

A moment later, we see the other boat about to enter the curve of the canyon.

 

 

We do not think we adjusted our camera for this shot.  The colors are more reddish in this image.

 

 

Another boat pops into view.

 

 

This colorful waterway does get its share of visitors.

 

 

Yet another view along the boat tour.

 

 

Here we have a very crisp, clear image of the colors in the rock with blue, desert sky above.

 

 

As the canyon narrows, our boat turns around and begins the return leg of the tour.

 

 

Looking up at the towering cliffs right above us.

 

 

Another view.

 

 

Impressive colors.

 

 

A few moments later, we enter this turn in the canyon.  The late morning sun is behind us now.

 

 

A look back.

 

 

Colorful rocks in this image.

 

 

Another view.

 

 

At the back of the boat, we see a happy tourist.

 

 

Approaching the wider part of the canyon before it meets the main part of the lake.

 

 

We see yet another boat in this popular canyon.

 

 

Walking back from the marina, we took this picture for its beauty and simplicity.

 

 

A view of some boats tied up in the distance.

 

 

Among the various activities we experienced on our holiday, this boat tour was one of the most enjoyable and yielded some of the best photos.

 

 

Walking back to the parking lot far above the marina, we see the Visitors Center.

 

 

copyright 2017 – larrysmusings.com

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