the tabu against questioning the Holocaust

Why can there be subjects of historical inquiry that are off limits?

It is currently illegal in many European nations to question the official or generally accepted account of the holocaust of European Jewry during the Second World War.  This is no distortion nor exaggeration.  European readers are well aware of these restrictions.

Our purpose here is not to dissect the official holocaust story, but rather to question the possible reasons or motivations for restricting objective and open inquiry into the official history of the holocaust, and stifling open discussions of the results of such inquiries that are made.

 

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the ossuary under Paris

An interesting historical item about Paris: beneath the city lies the world’s largest ossuary (a place or receptacle for the bones of the dead).  We only came across this fact quite recently and found it interesting.  Paris cemeteries were emptied of their dead beginning in the 1780s, and their bones were interred in the extensive tunnel system (former limestone mines and quarries) that lies beneath the city’s streets.  Estimates range from 6 to 7 million individuals have had their bones placed in this tunnel network.  We had wondered why in photos of Paris we do not see many tall buildings.  The presence of these extensive tunnels 60 feet below the surface prevents the large, heavy and deep foundations needed for modern sky scrapers.

Below the streets of modern Paris, every day is the day of the dead.

 

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morality: ends and means

The anniversary of the Allied firebombing of Dresden, Germany in 1945 prompts us to post these thoughts on means and ends.

If the desired objective to be achieved through action is morally licit, the means employed to achieve that end must also be morally licit.  In other words, the ends do not justify the means.

 

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